My Favorite Breed is Rescued

Duke and Rey

Duke and Rey

BLOG THE CHANGE FOR ANIMALS

A quarterly event hosted by BTC4Animals.com asking you to share a cause dear to your heart concerning animals. The idea is to blog, read, and BE the change for animals!

I love saving and helping pets. I would need a ranch to save all the pets I want! No breed or species discrimination.

I started fostering dogs three years ago. It all started with Heidi, an adorable little Shih Tzu who was abandoned at the kennels my daughter worked for at the time in 2009. Her owners just left her and said do what you want with her. Really!? Me, being a fan of large breeds, particularly ‘pit bull’ type dogs, agreed to take in this poor little homeless doggy. I have not looked back and she is now alpha of the house.

Then Lexis, my golden, joined our family, when her owner could no longer care for her. She came from the same boarding kennels as Heidi.

duke n rey dec 2011

Duke and Rey

I went through several dog rescues that did not work out for one reason or another. I love the work that rescues do, however, they are over-worked; too many dogs and not enough volunteers. You cannot save every dog. So do not try. You will drive yourself crazy!

All my pets ‘came’ into my life, I did not go looking for any of them. They are with me for a reason and I usually learn more from them than they learn from me.

Duke is my first foster dog from It’s the Pits Rescue in San Diego. I had him for a long time before he was adopted. It was bitter sweet, happy for him, but missing him at the same time. He was adopted and then brought back within three days the first time. This is the hardest part of fostering. I have an open door policy, they can return if it does not work out. This is not good for the dog or the foster mom. It takes them awhile to adjust again.

If you are going to adopt, please note that is not a trial run, this is a commitment to your new furry family member and there will be an adjustment period. Rescue dogs usually have some type of trauma in their life and the last thing they need is more trauma.

Baby Rey, as she is still called two years later is a rescued feral kitten. Read her story here.

vivian n rey

Vivian (Luna) and Rey

To give you an idea of how long I keep these dogs, in three years I have fostered three dogs. Duke, Vivian and now Sydney. I had Duke for almost a year. Then sweet timid Vivian. She was afraid of everything, even the trash bag. Vivian was adopted by one of my pet sitting clients and she lives happily with her human mommy and Titi, a Sphynx cat. Her new name is Luna Bella.

Sydney has been with me for a year. She is part of my family and would love to keep her. She has a unique personality and makes the cutest faces. I would like to keep them all! Her name is ‘Indy’ still according to It’s the Pits. I changed her name back to Sydney when I started fostering her. Dogs, no matter what age, will learn a new name within several weeks.

Me and Sydney

Me and Sydney

My daughter fostered for Holly’s Garden Rescue for about six months and fostered five dogs in that short time. Holly’s Garden is a small breed rescue, Lhasa, Shih Tzu’s, Maltese. These doggies get adopted a lot quicker than the ‘bully’ breeds. She adopted her last foster, Zeus, a blind male Shih Tzu, in January 2013.

There are pros and cons to fostering. It is not for everyone. It can be heartbreaking, rewarding, challenging, rewarding, frustrating, and did I mention rewarding. All dog rescues need help, if you cannot or do not want to foster, they need help walking dogs that are kenneled and not lucky enough to be in a home. They need help transporting dogs and help at adoption events.

The rescue provides everything your foster needs, food, vet visits, shots, crate, collar, leash, bedding. This is also a great way to see if a dog works out in your home if you are considering adding a pet to your family.

I have other rescue stories, like Pudsy, the greyhound. I kept her for a month and learned about how dogs are mistreated in the greyhound racing industry. I fell in love with her, too. She loved to cuddle and I was surprised at how a 100 lb. dog could curl up into a small space. :)

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17 thoughts on “My Favorite Breed is Rescued

    • i wish you luck in fostering and hope you get the opportunity to try it. once your husband sees the right cute little face, he will be puddy. :) if you can’t foster, there is always a need for volunteers with dog rescues and your local shelter. thanks happy trails

  1. Fostering is exactly as you describe it. “It can be heartbreaking, rewarding, challenging, rewarding, frustrating, and did I mention rewarding. ”

    I’ve done it myself a handful of times with nothing but fond memories and a general feeling of having done some good in this world even after the heartbreak and challenges. But, without those, the job wouldn’t feel like such a special privilege!

    Thanks for all you do for animals in need. Thanks for Blogging the Change!
    Kim
    BTC4animals.com

    • Hi Kim, I was so happy to find and join your community as I love helping animals and blogging. I started taking my blogging more seriously and getting ‘out’ there more. thanks for all you do as well!

  2. Thanks for writing this and for doing all you do to save animals lives.

    My favorite breed is rescued too. I’ve raised five adopted dogs, each had several human families before we got them. All great dogs that lived the rest of their lives with us.

    Keep on blogging for the change for animals.

  3. I love this! We adopted our dog, also named Duke, from a rescue, and you are right, it is an adoption not a shopping event! Within 24 hours of having him home, I couldn’t bear the idea of having to part with him. Yes, their are adjustments and sacrifices, but they are all so incredibly worth it! Great post! -Jess @ Life with Duke

    • yes they are worth it. my current foster was adopted and brought back within 24 hours. i was so sad for my foster. they go to a meet and greet before being adopted, too. of course, you cannot tell everything from one meeting. but giving a dog only 24 hours to adjust is ridiculous!

  4. Great post! My favorite breed is rescued, too. All of my adult dogs have been rescues and/or adopted from a shelter. I so admire wonderful people like you who foster and hope to someday be in a position to do that.

    • thank you for your kind words! thanks to you for rescuing dogs. every dog adopted is one less in a shelter or rescue. :) if you cannot foster, rescues and shelters always need volunteers to walk dogs, transport, etc. if that is something you’re interested in. again thank you for your compliment and thanks for rescuing your doggies!

  5. Thank you for all you do to help dogs in need, especially the bully breeds. They seem to suffer the most when it comes to shelters and euthanization.

    I have also fostered dogs in the past (all 3 of my current dogs were foster failures) and I agree. It is so rewarding. I wish more people would take the chance and consider it. I also agree they need to know that adopting a dog is about making a commitment and one not to be made lightly.

    Thanks for writing and joining Blog the Change.

    Mel Freer
    No Dog About It
    BtC4A team

    • Mel, thank you for your warm message. yes pit bulls and chihuahuas are the top breeds in the shelters here. pit bulls have a bad rap, BSL and other restrictions do not help with adopting them out. i am happy i found your community and glad to be a part of it. :)

  6. Sydney looks like a sweetie! I wish I could foster, but the management here only allows one dog and I already have my Pierre.
    Like you said – he learned his name “within several weeks.” He learned his right away! He is quite the blessing to my family and I am glad he rescued us.

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